temporal

2019

For 14 musicians (fl, ob, cl, bn, hn, tpt, tbn, perc, hp, 2vn, va, vc, cb)

7 minutes

Commissioned by Esprit Orchestra as part of its New Wave Reprise festival. Premiered by members of Esprit Orchestra, guest-conducted by Alison Yun-Fei Jiang at the Trinity St. Paul’s Centre for Faith, Justice and the Arts, Toronto, Canada, April 5 2019

By cycling and recapitulating melodies and sounds, the work evokes a fragile dream-like state, where the perception of time, events and memories is fragmented.

Recording available upon inquiry.

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Guest-conducting members of Esprit Orchestra. Photo credit: Malcolm Cook


in absent waters

2018

For piano quintet

10.5 minutes

Commissioned by the inaugural Graham Sommer Competition for Young Composers. Premiered by Sara Laimon and the Molinari Quartet in Pollack Hall, McGill University, Montréal, Canada, Sep 29 2018

The work is a farewell letter and an elegy to a traveler embarking on a different journey. Written in memory of Peter Longworth.

Video of full performance:

 

on light and birds

2017

For woodwind quintet

8.5 minutes

Commissioned by Imani Winds. Premiered by Imani Winds at Rockefeller Memorial Chapel, Chicago, IL, USA, May 12 2018

Inspired by Elizabeth Jennings’ poem Bird Sunrise in Winter, the quintet was imagined as a flock. Music takes on a flight with free, fluctuating, sometimes unified, and sometimes chaotic movements — movements of lights and shadows, of moments and memories, and of an invincible and vigorous vitality within all living creatures.

Full recording:

 

birds, reincarnate

2016

For string quartet

8 minutes

Premiered by JACK Quartet at Provincetown Playhouse, New York, NY, USA, April 24 2016

Additional Performance:

  • Cassatt Quartet, Vinalhaven School, Vinalhaven, ME, USA, July 17 2017

The work resulted from my own contemplations and experiences on the matter of immigration. At the time I was writing this work I was also strongly inspired and moved by the Korean poet Ko Un’s poem called Letters, which I randomly stumbled upon. The poet’s uses of imagery and metaphor were extremely moving, beautiful yet cruel. Below is an excerpt from the poem that struck me the most:

When birds take off by mistake, death resonates all around.
I will reach where the birds call
And receive letters in that high sky.

Birds fall from the sky for me, they die. Such is the life of the lark.
It is certain that in finished works lie the unfinished.
So finally, reincarnate birds weep in glistening letters.

Full recording: